Tuesday, March 10, 2009

IOW: Where Eagles Fly

Deborah is hosting In Other Words at Chocolate and Coffee. Visit her to read more IOW posts and to link your own.


Refuse to be average.
Let your heart soar as high as it will.

by Aiden Wilson Tozer


We live in a time where being average is enough to get by. People who do a bit more than average get lauded as heroes. But what is exceptional about just doing what it takes to get a job done? And when did the idea of doing our very best become out of fashion?

My husband spent 22 years in the United States Air Force where he was taught their core values: Integrity First, Service before self, and Excellence in all we do. These values were already a part of his life before he joined the USAF because of the examples of his mother and grandparents. For him it was business as usual to do an above average job.

I remember a time when as a young airman he was recognized as the "Airman of the Quarter" and was nominated for "Airman of the Year." His response was a puzzled one. He said, "Why are they giving me an award for just doing my job?" For him soaring above the crowd is just the way he does things. It has nothing to do with politics or getting ahead in his job.

When he became a leader of other airman, he held high expectations for those who worked for him. He even gained a reputation as the "silent assassin" because of his soft words and looks of disappointment when one under his responsibility didn't perform up to what he thought they could. They said it was worse than getting yelled at. His people began to feel those core values as more than just slogans when they saw them in action through his life.

In our home, even with our children who live in their own home, there is the same attitude of not wanting to disappoint Dad. It has shaped who our children are. They have a father who loves them and expects them to do their best at all times. His disappointment is not because their failures may reflect upon him, but because he knows they are not reaching their God-given potential. His joy in their successes is true rejoicing and celebration of them reaching their goals.

All Christians have a Father who expects us to do more than just get by. He equips us for each encounter. He leaves it up to us to decide whether we are going to be average or to soar where eagles fly. Personally, I want to soar!

"But those who wait upon God get fresh strength. They spread their wings and soar like eagles, They run and don't get tired, they walk and don't lag behind." Isaiah 40:31 [The Message]


6 comments:

Miriam said...

My husband has not served in the military, but he is an engineer and seeks to rise above expectations in his work and home life as well. I have been so thankful for that our whole marriage. And when we became parents it was clear to me that, in this, he was creating a good picture of a Father God for our children. God DOES want the best for us and from us. It is inspiring. Thanks for posting this today.

Denise said...

Amen

Debbie said...

I love that Isaiah verse about soaring on wings as eagles. I want to soar too. Your husband sounds like a wise man and has provided a good example for your children.

Esthermay said...

Wow.If more men were raised like Mr. Amazing -- and shared his work-ethic -- this world would an entirely different place! As a culture, we have settled for "average" and "below-average" and we call it "the norm."
I could, of course, make this a political statement, but I won't. lol
:-)
Being "average" as a Christian has far greater consequences than does anything in our culture. . . .
I'm glad I had a dad who served in the Navy -- like your husband, he is a man of quality who "soars."

Laurie Ann said...

What a man of integrity! I loved reading your take on this quote. Very uplifting and inspirational. We should never settle for just getting by. We should exceed and think that is the norm, expecting nothing less.

writingcanvas said...

It has shaped who our children are. They have a father who loves them and expects them to do their best at all times. His disappointment is not because their failures may reflect upon him, but because he knows they are not reaching their God-given potential. His joy in their successes is true rejoicing and celebration of them reaching their goals.

Oh, I love this! Many times dads do not realize their role in children's lives is such a picture of Jesus. THANK YOU for sharing today!